Cubicle to CEO

Trouble Niching Down? How To Serve Two Audiences, But Only Market To One ($10K Month Case Study with 100 Followers)

July 18, 2022 Ellen Yin featuring Victoria McCausland Episode 151
Cubicle to CEO
Trouble Niching Down? How To Serve Two Audiences, But Only Market To One ($10K Month Case Study with 100 Followers)
Show Notes Transcript

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After 3 years, I’ve decided to permanently close the enrollment doors to my 12 month group mentorship program - Cubicle to CEO - (just the program, not the brand - don’t worry) on August 5th. Through this program, we’ve helped hundreds of service providers, coaches, and freelancers work with their dream clients and make their first $10,000 income month. That’s why we’re taking this final month to celebrate a few of our Cubicle to CEO students who recently reached that big milestone, including today’s guest, Victoria McCausland.

Victoria shares with us her incredible story of loss and how she channeled her own grieving experience into completing her PhD in Communication Studies and a life-changing service connecting military and first responder families who are grieving a loved one with non-profits who provide much-needed trauma support to these deserving communities.

In today’s case study, Victoria shares how she struggled to niche down when she first joined our program, knowing she was meant to serve two distinct audiences but unsure how to get her offer in front of the right people - especially with no online audience of her own. If you’re in the same boat, you’ll be encouraged by how Victoria navigated this dilemma to successfully serve both audiences, while only marketing to one, scaling to $10K months and beyond with only 100 followers.


Connect with Victoria:


Links mentioned in this episode:

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00:00.00

Hey Victoria, welcome to our show! I am so thrilled to have you on the show because your story is so important. I want more people to hear it and as I was telling you before we hit record we are retiring cubicle to Ceo our final group of students. We're closing the doors for enrollment August fifth of this year and I'm just so excited to use this last month to really celebrate some of our most amazing community members including yourself so we're here today because we're celebrating your ten K month but also I think your story as just a person I think will be so inspiring to many who are dealing with adversity or hardship. So anyways, Victoria for starters I want to know what is your own cubicle or maybe in your case academia to Ceo story.


01:39.17

Victoria

Yeah, um, okay so back in the summer of 2011 I was in grad school I was working towards my phd um, in communication studies and I was on summer break and so I was visiting my family. My husband was deployed and I got the knock on the door that no military spouse ever wants to get. Um, we had found out that my husband and a bunch of his teammates. Ah. In a helicopter that got shot down over Afghanistan and so um, at that point in my life. Ah I just didn't know what to do? You know there was a complete loss of direction when I was in the middle of this program. But um. You know I didn't have kids I didn't really know. Okay, well am I gonna continue doing this program. What do I want to do so you know my loss as I said really led to this loss of direction, where am I going to move forward and um, I'm a believer and so I you know really leaned on my faith at that point and thought you know. All of these men that had died serving their country. They really had this strong sense of purpose and they felt a calling to serve and I kind of wondered what? What's my calling like what am I going to do right now. I don't know and um I just knew immediately in the days that followed I was. Very concerned about the other people. The other families who have lost somebody because these were all teammates with my late husband and so they all worked really closely together. Many of them had spouses, most of them had children I did not at the time and so I just. Ah, really felt called to figure out what am I going to do to help these families. Um, as time passed I knew that I wanted to figure out how to best do that and so I immediately was in touch with all these different foundations and organizations that were trying to help the families. And talking to them about what was going on and how they could help and then sure enough you know several months later I felt like god opened another door for me because I had been learning in those months. What the families needed and how there were really all these gaps in support. To the families. Um, you've got these organizations and people who really want to help and then you have these families who are just craving help. They just need it. You know they really were in the throes of everything that was going on and um, there was not a lot of connection. There.


04:20.45

Victoria

You know there's not a lot of understanding of how can we best serve them and we know this just as like normal people going through life. It doesn't have to be military when something terrible happens to somebody oftentimes. We really really want to help them over like we're at a loss. We don't know what to say. We don't know what to do so fast forward this door opens for me and. Um, the military community that my husband was a part of their leadership had asked me would you be interested in running programs for all of these families. They had heard about my military experience because I had served previously to going to grad school. They learned about my grad school. Um, education and the research I was doing which was specifically on how military families who endure hardship get and receive support from other people which was crazy to think about how that lined up and then um, you know they knew I had the personal experience then of having lost somebody and and so I kind of hmmed and hawed about it because I thought im still working on this phd I don't know a bunch of people tell me not to do it because they felt like it was going to be too emotional and difficult. But like I said I felt this calling and I thought this is the formal structure that's going to be needed to help these families out and so. I was then able to work with these foundations for the next five years to really build up support programs that didn't exist for families that they'll follow in our community. Um, which was amazing to just kind of start from the ground up and say okay, you've got these families. You've got these people who want to serve. How can we make this happen and so I built some amazing programs to work with all these families really connect them to one another and then also the people who wanted to support them and then I knew that it was time for me to kind of step away. Um, and it wasn't because I wanted to start my own company to be honest I was. Because I needed to get back to academia I had to finish my phd I wanted to continue researching. I loved being an educator. Um and I also had started my own family. I had met somebody. We're married. Um, and I thought you know every point there's a time to change and pivot and move as you know with the cubicle to Ceo you know that there's a good time to move and I knew that this was my time to step away from it. Um, but what was amazing was that I stepped away knowing that I was probably letting go and what happened was the community and one of the foundations that it worked with asked me if I'd be willing to stay on as a contractor and work some of the programs I had worked on previously and continue to build things and I thought well that's my favorite part of what I did um was just working specifically on like how do we build something to find a way to support the families.


07:08.17

Victoria

And ah so I said yes and I thought after you know a couple months a year of doing that with this one foundation I don't have to just serve my community. There are so many other military first responder communities out there and they deserve this just as much as our community does and I want to figure out how I can step forward and work with their foundations who maybe don't have those resources don't have the time to help their families and so that's a long-winded version of the story but it kind of went from academia to the you know government cubicle to home and then back into to my own business.


07:46.93

ellenyin

Amazing. Your work is so important. In many ways I think of you as a support matchmaker, you help the people who need it most connect with the right resources and it is such a problem but also such an opportunity for all of these families who like you said they're dealing with trauma. They're dealing with grief and there are resources out there to support them but not knowing about them and maybe those organizations like you said not having the capacity or the resources to better market themselves to get in front of the right people you being that in-between person to help facilitate that connection is. Such important work I can really hear the passion and your voice. I'm especially inspired by how for you, you looked at your husband and you know his teammates that sacrificed their lives and you said I see the purpose and the calling they had in the work that they did and you wanted to. You know, honor that by having your own purpose and calling in the work that you do so you are incredible. None of all, thank you for your service. Thank you for the work that you do, thank you for the sacrifices that your family has made. Um I I Want to know when you decided to step out into your own business, did you have did you have a vision for what it could become or was it you just saying I'm going to try this and kind of take it day by day, and what was your biggest obstacle in getting momentum or lift off the ground as your own entity rather than working through an established network like the government.


09:40.67

Victoria

That's such a good question Ellen because I um I stepped into it almost feeling like who am I to do this right? There are so many foundations and in fact, so many people said why don't you start your own nonprofit. And one of the reasons I was not interested in that is because so many already exist and I know having done some of the work for the previous 5 years as a ah government employee I knew what my strengths were I knew that where the gaps were and it wasn't for lack of funding and it wasn't for lack of nonprofit it was the lack of the people who could actually really understand the needs of these families and then do the work to support them. Um, and so I didn't know what I was getting into from day one I knew that I wanted to work with that specific foundation and I was going to kind of get my feet on the ground which was perfect in a lot of personal ways as well because I just had a baby and I could kind of time things. You know, according to my schedule and when I was able to do. But I'm um. Like to call myself an idea fairy or a visionary I'm really good at coming up with these like big picture ideas for down the road and I knew that I didn't want to just stop at the people who were right in front of me because what I had become very aware of over the years was how many other families and other communities. Their loss is just as important. Um, they are dealing with so many issues and some of the foundations that support them don't have the resources that they need in order to support them and so I knew that I had to figure out a way to get to those organizations. So that I could serve the people that my heart you know, bled for um and and I still feel like there's even growth that you know I've got like this like five year ten year vision for what I love to do to help these people and um I try not to get too far ahead of myself because then I miss. Foundational work that I need to do to really get things going.


11:50.38

ellenyin

Yeah, absolutely I can totally relate to that because I am also very big picture vision ah vision driven and you know it. It can be hard balancing the inbetween of okay, but what are we doing today to get closer to that vision while also still keeping that vision on mind so I can completely relate to that. Um, when you joined cubicle the Ceo you know one of the things I remember one about meeting you on one of our calls is I was like wow this woman has such a different type of service business like so different from the students that we normally work with um I mean we we do have I would say members across the gamut in the service industry but yours was such a unique service because I don't know we we had just never worked with anyone specifically helping military and first responder families and then more importantly, you're kind of bridging that gap between you know, a for-profit sector you know as your own business but also the nonprofit sector and and then helping the people who truly need it. So maybe if you could just for context walk us through real quick the context of your business model because I think that would help the listeners understand the rest of this conversation and the rest of this case study of how you made your $10K. So who is your end client is it the nonprofits who are paying you to help them reach the right families or are the families the clients. Paying you for the service of you going out and doing the research and connecting them to the right resources.


13:24.36

Victoria

So that was probably the biggest point of confusion that I had from the get-go and I remember having a hot seat call with you in towards the beginning of my cuic close Ceo Journey being like Ellen I serve 2 audiences I serve too and you're like okay, we'll explain this to me. Um, so I didn't even really truly understand the answer to this, the true end user the client for me what I come to realize is truly these foundations. Um, but the products I create for these foundations serve their families and so I really do I serve 2 masters because I care so much about at the end of the day I'm successful if I've served their families but the people who are hiring me to do that work are these foundations and when I got to that point of understanding that I Mean. It became so much more clear to me how I needed to change my messaging and how I um package myself as I talked to my true clients because I thought well I need to get to these families. How do I help all these families? Okay, let me create a course to help these families and reach them directly. And I realized the reason I really struggled with that is because again I didn't become my own nonprofit if I if I wanted to go straight to the families I should have become my own nonprofit but I knew there are these other organizations that really did exist who really do have the heart to serve them and I wanted to help them use their donor dollars that. Good humans have given to support these families to really move the needle on their walk through their healing and their grief journey.


15:07.39

ellenyin

Yeah, that clarity of knowing exactly who you're talking to is a game changer in any business and I want to pull out this point for anyone listening who also feels maybe like Victoria did when she first joined cubicle to Ceo. Feeling caught between two audiences or you know two masters 2 stakeholders I think the distinction here is that your product your service may ultimately benefit one specific type of person. Like in Victoria's case it's the families of the fall in who need this support and that is ultimately the end user. However, when you are marketing your service or your offer you need to be thinking about who is the actual decision maker. Right? Because sometimes those two parties are not the same person, sometimes they are, sometimes they are like for example in my service based business. You know when I started my service based business my marketing client they were the decision maker and the end user because you know they would hire me for. Social media management and then I would also be serving them through social media management. But there are many of you out there in a service-based business where the decision maker is different perhaps than the end user and so having that distinction is really important because if your messaging is geared towards the end user the families of the fallen. They don't have necessarily the funds or the resources maybe to actually take advantage of the solution that you're offering whereas these nonprofits who have the donor dollars like you said who specifically exists for this purpose you being able to convince their key stakeholders. This is the right way to use your dollars to serve the most amount of families that makes so much more sense so I want you to kind of walk us through like what was that process like of finally getting clarity on which audience you serve how? How did you arrive at that conclusion because I know there's so many people listening to this podcast. Who hear me say all the time choose your one person choose your one person and they're like but I came in there's definitely two people that I help so walk us through your own process. How did you use our market research process in the program and the coaching support to finally gain that clarity?


17:26.99

Victoria

So we had um, part of the part of the prop program as you know is to do your market research which I did and I did it for both people because I thought I had to so I did my record research on both sides and then I um I started working on my power of one statement and I remember sending that back and forth page and you know just getting all the all the help and input from our members as well as you and I put it on there and was like this is how I'm going and I even did my evergreen posts and was really trying to to get out there. Um, and not to say that it didn't work I think it did and I was a newbie to social I still I'm a newbie to social media. So brand new just doing my none initial posts. Um, but I joined the paid to create challenge and I created this course um which I knew the course was something that was going to really affect. My audience of surviving families that it was something that wasn't just for people who had just lost somebody but something that they would find useful throughout their journey and I knew that from both my market research but also from my previous experience working with families and so I built this course and I put it out there. I thought surely I'm going to get that beta group surely this is going to reach the people and it kind of flopped you know I was really surprised because I thought I can't believe this and you know part of it was that you know I really did have a very very tight I mean at that point I had like maybe less than 40 people. So if you think about the numbers as we learned through your master class and everything that the conversion is not surprising that I it kind of flopped. But um I also knew from the program that it wasn't my product like the course itself I knew the course was good I knew that it's what they needed I knew that as soon as people got into it they would benefit from it. Um, so I thought to myself. What am I missing here and I kind of thought well that's my audience this is something maybe if I switch should I pivot and think about this as something that I should be putting out there to the audience of those foundations and as soon as I started thinking about that. It's also. A whole idea of borrowing people's audiences right? I didn't have an audience. They had their audiences. So as soon as I said hey I've got this course um, could you put this out to your people and if you get enough people are interested. We'll launch it and I sent it out to just a few of the foundations I had been working with that at the time and immediately I started getting registrations I mean it was just I I thought why did I not realize that this is how this whole process is going to work sooner I mean yes I am serving these families. The content itself needs to apply to these families.


20:19.51

Victoria

But the people I'm sending it to.. They're the ones that own the audiences, these are their communities and that's when I really started to shift things and realize the framework the system that I create that works for them is a community and connection Framework they're their communities. It's not me I don't need to build that community maybe eventually one day. Years down the line I will have my own community of surviving families that love my programs and products. But really I exist to serve these foundations and help lift them up so that they can create their community and their connection with these families. Um, so I mean everything started clicking right after that I realized I got I've got these courses and this content that these families really do enjoy it I was right? they wanted what I had um and then we just kept building from there and it just continued to work so it was an exciting moment. I mean it seems kind of obvious in a way. But. It was such a struggle for me because I did not want to let go of the fact that I really wanted that connection, that immediate connection to these families but that wasn't for me to have and it's not for me to have right now. My service is to help these foundations and through that. That's how I really touched the lives of the families.


21:32.78

ellenyin

There are so many gold nuggets Victoria and what you just shared truly I want to pull 3 things out and that you said that I think are so important for people to take away from this conversation. None you mentioned? Ah you know you wanted that direct connection with those families. Immediately. But you realize that in this season of building your business that may not happen right away and you said you know someday someday that community you might build up that big community but I want to pull out that piece because as a reminder to everyone listening audience growth and community growth is an amazing long term strategy. But it is by no means the what is it? The thing that should stand in your way the obstacle that should prevent you from being able to make money and make income in your business in the meantime. So if you are relying on audience growth in order to. Sell your services or sell your offers then you are not capitalizing on borrowed traffic which Victoria also mentioned and borrowed traffic is a key concept that we teach in cubicle to Ceo in our twelve month group program and it's also. And episode that I just did on the podcast. So if you're listening to Victoria's episode make sure you go back and listen to None of our recent episodes that's titled what is borrowed traffic. We'll make sure to link it in the show notes below as well. Um I think it's so important this is I think this is the key catalyst for all entrepreneurs with small audiences is learning how to get in front of existing communities just like Victoria did understanding that nonprofits had spent years sometimes decades building up those connections directly with the families who most needed her support and her content and realizing. Okay. I can fill that gap. They don't have maybe someone on staff to create the quality of courses that Victoria's able to create, but they have the audience and so if she can get in front of that audience. That's a direct pipeline to build her business so that is ah key takeaway number 2 and then key takeaway number 3 is something so brilliant that you said when you took the paid to create challenge which if you're brand new to our world pay to create is a 3 day live course creation challenge that helps you turn the idea you're in your head into an online course that you can presell to your founding students and you mentioned it flopped right? like your beta when you put it out initially it didn't get any traction but what's so smart is what most people would do in that situation Victoria right. And and maybe you might have even taken this path had you maybe not had the training from cubicle to Ceo is they immediately go oh what's wrong with me what's wrong with my offer like I suck I'm not qualified for this Whatever it is but you were smart and you looked at the data and you said okay hold on wait a second I know what I created is super quality. But I have forty followers so it's a traffic problem right? You looked at it. You said I didn't either didn't get in front of enough people or I didn't get in front of the right people to have this offer take off and I think this is also so key to understand is when when something doesn't work and your business don't immediately default to going oh I should change the price or I should scrap this offer or I should you know whatever all the things that we we tell ourselves we need to do I want you to actually look at the data and say what where is the sales leak happening like what is preventing this thing from working and maybe it is in most cases for most people, especially if you're more at the beginning stages of entrepreneurship. It's almost always a traffic problem. So um, this concept if you want to dive a little deeper into it we covered in an episode. It's one of the ten K Month series episodes. Um. Where I talk about the 3 metrics you need to track in your business. So if you're curious about that too. We'll link that episode in the show notes for you to catch up on but Victoria. Okay, so once you got in front of these audiences. Let's get back to your case study. Once you got in front of these audiences and these nonprofits shared it out with their communities. You just like took off. It was like a rocket ship like he said registrations were flowing in. How did the cash situation work so was it the organization saying oh we had a 100 families sign up in our community. We're going to pay you a contract that is equivalent of a 100 course registrations were they covering the costs for the families. Or where the family's directly um, able to you know, pay their own way and register for your resources and then you were doing some sort of rev share with the nonprofit.


26:12.10

Victoria

So The way I worked it was I had the foundations themselves cover the cost for the family. So The registrations would come in the foundation saw which of their families or from their communities and then they covered the costs of those families which. Great because some of these organizations had not been able to do this during Covid too. So Some of these organizations have not been able to support their families and do anything um previously I only did in-person programming and so that was another unique shift I One of the reasons I signed up for page to create was Because we weren't doing any in-person stuff at that point you know we were only doing virtual type things and so I thought well I can do a virtual you know I I'm an educator I've taught on I'll do a virtual course and so it wasn't even just a course it was a true program but virtual um and so they were excited to have a new way to reach their families and again that that aligns with my core belief that these organizations they make promises a lot of us do as as humans something happens to somebody that are like hey you know I'm here to support you I'm going to be here for you right? These organizations say the same things families remember that they remember. Those promises and when you don't deliver on them or when you don't continue to show up. Um, that could be heartbreaking. I mean these people have already lost such a significant person in their life and then to not really feel like they have that support structure underneath them is a very difficult pill to swallow and so. To provide that service with the foundation so they could say hey we're doing something we're here. Are you interested, would this be something that would be useful to you? It was great. It was great to offer them that service and then you know in turn be able to connect with the families and see what else was going on with them and how else we could serve them in that moment.


28:01.49

ellenyin

Ah I'm in love with your business model. Yes, yes, yes, yes, it's so smart to go to the foundations that have the resources that have the dollars and build contracts with them so they're your end client. That's who you're marketing to and then in turn they're able to use those dollars for intended purposes for good and help more families. So can you give us if you remember a breakdown of your first ten k month how many either how many in clients I guess organizations did you work with in that month to make that ten k month revenue or conversely perhaps how many people did you have registered for your program that allowed the organizations to you know, pay you the the appropriate ah revenue that helped you hit that milestone I know because your business model is so unique. I just think this breakdown would be really illuminating for our listeners.


28:56.14

Victoria

Right? So I had I think there were 4 different organizations that I worked with and 3 of them being foundations and None being an outside donor who just wanted to support anybody that maybe fell outside of those 3 specific foundations. They each had specific community admissions and so that's kind of what's really unique and can be very challenging about the way I partner with these businesses or these foundations they might serve one particular community but they only serve certain types of losses. And so when I create a program that's kind of a joint program where I offer it to any foundation. Some families might hear about it and be interested if they're not getting the word directly from the foundations and um and I want to like I said I really want to be able to serve. Any of these families who are so deserving and so I oftentimes try to build a network of really supportive generous people and so um, we have these donors every once in a while who are like I will sponsor up to this many families who fall outside that group. Um, so I think there were 4 sponsoring parties. Um, and I want to say for that particular month I had somewhere between 20 to 25 people register. Um for the program and so it worked out great. I mean it was the first time doing it and It really helped me use that baseline for okay, how can I do this the next time what makes sense the next time. Um, as far as you know what I was bringing in for my contractors and support needed to run a program like that virtually you know even virtual I wanted to make it as um. Such a feeling of being there where you can touch, see and feel type things and so it wasn't just you know me talking to them on a screen There was a lot more going on.


30:48.88

ellenyin

That's such an important note to highlight I think because I think the general public perception if you're not super familiar with the course world or if you've never created an online course yourself is that courses have no ah, no expenses or ongoing costs. To continue to deliver and that's simply not true, right? Like within our programs whether it's a Diy product or whether it is our more high- touch program like cubicle de ceo there are always ongoing costs associated with everything from the small costs like software and hosting. Up to the larger costs like the labor you pay for contractors and employees and health insurance and all of these things that keep that engine going that allow you to show up and serve your students I think that's really important and it kind of I think is a great reminder too that oftentimes as women, I was having a discussion with um our our book club members at the clubhouse which is my women's co-working space here in Salem and we we were talking about this concept of income versus impact and how for women and I don't know Victoria if maybe you relate to this especially kind of. Being involved in the nonprofit world, there’s sometimes a stigma where as women when we're asked like what is most important to you we feel like we feel shame or or demonized if we say that we care about both right? We want to make income in our businesses. And we want to make an impact and it kind of feels like you have to choose. It's like no, you have to only care about impact and you know to hell with income but realizing too that if that was the mindset that you approach business in your business actually won't survive to create the impacts that you need and so have you have you ever felt. That in your work as you know as someone connecting nonprofits with families who truly need your resources.


32:48.50

Victoria

Yeah I mean I think I feel it most when people ask me and I understand the confusion. They ask me or if they say oh I thought you were a nonprofit. You know you're company said Yes I Am you know and I explain to them I do it not because I Want to make hand over fist in my company. Um, not that there's anything wrong with that. But I do it because I feel like this is the way that I make the most impact. I make sure that I'm compensated and that I'm compensating people who can serve this mission. In the best way possible. Um, and also because you know I see on the opposite side of that. The reason that a lot of you know my avatar is the people that I serve. The reason they are unable to serve these families is because often they are burnt out. They're probably not making what they should in order to best serve these families. They don't have the staff because they're trying to stay under that threshold so that they can get a good rating on Charity Smith or um, charity navigator and so it's so difficult for them and I understand that struggle. But it prevents them from being able to serve the families and I did not want to be another person you know in that game because it's already you know I already made the sake for so many years of forgetting to pay myself or not budgeting that to the very end and then going Oh Well I paid everybody else is doing good but I guess next time I'll get myself you know and so um. It's something that you do have to think about and you do. I think it's such an important thing to point out to people that you will make the most impact when you realize that you got to value your services and your time in what you are giving to people. Ah and it's not necessarily. I Mean it isn't a bad thing. It isn't a bad thing to value that for yourself.


34:45.66

ellenyin

Yeah, you put that in such a great way. I think to your point exactly what you said about if you weren't able to compensate yourself through this business then you couldn't allocate the level of. Time and energy commitment that you do to this work because if you're in survival mode. You have to balance. You know your work in your business with just paying the bills and that would probably require you to. Get another job to be able to support your own family and in doing so you're taking away time from that important work that you're doing for these nonprofits and for these families so that that's put in such a beautiful way and I think you know this conversation Victoria you keep sparking reminders of past conversations I've had on this podcast. So when you said, um, you know how a lot of these nonprofits. The reason one of the reasons perhaps impacting why they were not able to get their resources out into the world is because their staff is burnt out from low funding. Um, as far as staff payment. It reminds me of a conversation I had with Blythe Hill who is the Ceo and founder of Dressember A really well-known international nonprofit benefiting. Um those who suffer from human trafficking and um, when she came on our podcast. She shared something that forever changed the way I look at nonprofits. Um, because I was of the belief as I'm sure many in the general public who have not worked in nonprofits are, I always believed a nonprofit was doing the right thing or being more successful if their administration fee was the percentage of their annual budget that went toward staff. Ah, salaries were as low as humanly possible and the maximum amount of dollars went to other things like program funding or whatnot. Um but blythe actually kind of destroyed that myth for me when she was like you know what? It's interesting. This mindset we have about nonprofits and she's like it's the reason why some of the world's biggest problems. Don't get solved because the most talented people with the sharpest minds. The solution creators they get pulled away from nonprofits and they get attracted to. You know these huge companies that have the budget and the salary to pay very competitive wages. Um and in doing so we're actually taking away the brightest minds in the world from solving the world's most important problems and she said it should be the opposite where we prioritize being able to fairly compensate. You know, brilliant, talented people and their time and energy and efforts. Um in getting the brightest minds in the room to work on these problems. So I know that's a little bit of a tangent but I just felt like it's important to.


37:36.85

Victoria

No, it's so true. Yeah, I've met some incredible people through my work who do end up having to step away and it's not that they don't love what they did. I mean you either start a nonprofit or work from a nonprofit because you've got a huge heart for whatever that mission is but you can only go so far if you are not being compensated um and and valued in that way, especially if you don't have some other means of making sure you feel secure right? And so you think you see that all the time and it is very difficult and then it's difficult for the nonprofits to to restart again right? because you're starting that train all over again as far as training and building up for in my world if you take away a program director or somebody whoever was in charge of building that relationship with those families that trust in that relationship. Those families are so hard to build and so you start all over from chrome None um, and so it's very important to retain those people. Um and and find a way to increase either your staff or bring on you know a company like mine who can. It really adds it up so that you can build and you take some of that strain off so you're not just focusing on the administrative tasks of the day.


38:57.11

ellenyin

Yes, going back real quick to your breakdown of your $10000 month. So you mentioned when you made your ten k month you were serving about 25 end families who were actually enrolled in your program and then of course the nonprofits were the ones. Covering those costs or or um, you know individual donors were sponsoring those um class fees or course fees. Ah if I'm doing the math correctly in my head and you know I didn't pull out a calculator. So I just think this is the right math 10000 divided by 25 is your course about $400 per enrollment right.


39:33.66

Victoria

Yeah, it was and it worked out because I think that I had priced it after my beta at about that and so it actually just happened to work out that way. Um, which was exciting because then I was like oh look at that. But. So yeah.


39:52.36

ellenyin

That's Amazing. So quick plug for your program because I think it's because we want to use our platform to, you know, highlight the important work that so many women entrepreneurs are doing and I think your work is. Incredibly important so tell us if there's someone listening to this podcast right now who either is someone who has lost a loved one. Um in the armed forces or you know in the first responders families or maybe know someone who could benefit from your program. Ah how how can they best get in touch with you. What is your program called?


40:25.40

Victoria

So my company's called patcincia Perfectus Um, and I yeah it it's like patient I A so p a T I E N T I A perfectus.


40:29.74

ellenyin

You spell that spell that for our listeners because I know they might not know right away.


40:43.78

Victoria

P e r f e c t US and it's latin for perfect endurance. Um, so just understanding that surviving families their road is going to be full of trials and tribulations is a struggle but everybody's journey on that road is perfect for them and it will all be different, but it'll all be perfect for them and then it also aligns kind of with the nonprofit journey I mean you got to. It's a long road and it's a long race and you cannot just stop short supporting these families with their emergent loss. You need to be there for them for the long call. So having that endurance to keep going so I create I work with these foundations to build specific programs that are unique to whatever their family population is needing at that time and so if there are families who want to connect and who are interested. Um, I'd love to connect through my Dms as Ellen knows just to understand you know which which community are they part of are they already linked up with a um, ah nonprofit that serves them and if so I would love to connect with that nonprofit on their behalf and understand how we can help them better I think that something that nonprofits. Are aware of but it's very hard to tackle as far as a challenge is it's really, ah, easy to serve the people who raise their hand and ask for help because you know what their problem is you know what they need but I would venture to say the majority of their families are not raising their hands and asking for help the majority of them are silent. Um. They're only talking to the people that are very close to them and so I challenge all of them to ask themselves are you really serving all of your communities because if you're not then are you really fulfilling your mission. Um, and so that's really kind of what I'm trying to to help them do is to bridge that gap and make sure that what are the needs of your entire community. How can we reach that goal of trying to figure out how we can support as many people in your spread and family community as possible.


42:42.48

ellenyin

Oh such a good good point I think this applies to anyone listening whether you know you are working in the nonprofit sector or whether you're you know, building your small business. You have to look at how often am I really connecting with the people that I'm intending to serve and really understanding their needs rather than making assumptions about what I think they need right because Victoria is living proof of that until she really dove into the market research and tested the messaging. It was impossible to discern who is it that I should actually be speaking to and what do they need to hear to make that connection click for them. So such a great reminder Victoria um, one last question before we get to you know our ending question for all of our guests. Um, as you know, ah our program cubicle to Ceo. We're closing the doors August 5th and we're going through our final year with our final students and then you know the program will be wrapped. Up by next August of 2023 but since this is our final month of enrollment and then final chance for people to join this program and to receive direct mentorship from me. What would you say looking back on you know the journey that you've made through our program. What would you say to someone who is on the fence about joining like maybe they feel like if they're there a service provider, a coach, a consultant, freelance or someone who works with clients one to one and sells a service and they're thinking I don't know I don't know if this is the next right? step for me. What would you share.


44:21.33

Victoria

Um, two things. So the one being that as you mentioned I do have a very unique offer and kind of model so that was one of the things I wasn't sure if I fit and I think that initially when we interact over dms I mentioned that to you I'm not sure if this is going to make sense for me. Um. But because there's such a variety in the program of different people in different models. You can easily apply your own model or service to what other people are doing and have ah I mean a plethora of learning lessons from everybody else which I find so valuable and is a very. Active Facebook community I mean I've been part of numerous other communities. I feel like this one is one of the most active ones that I'm part of. People are always jumping in and answering questions and offering their advice. Um, the none thing that I would mention is that. I started I mean I've been part of cubicle to CEO for a while now and so I started like I said with no Instagram no Facebook nothing and really I mean I had so much learning to do from that initial part but then. About a year later I was rewatching everything because you learn new stuff and there's new information that you can get later on in your business journey. So depending on the stage you're at it's still useful to you because we're going to be picking up different parts of that foundation and building upon it. Um, and I mean it's just been. Very helpful to me and that's why I have not wanted to let it go because I know that I'm still building process myself.


45:56.57

ellenyin

Thank you Thank you for sharing your honest experience in the program and we're so excited to be with you for another year. Um, you know we would love to have you in the community for as long as we have the community open and you are such an important member in our community. So Victoria, thank you. So much. Um, for sharing your story with us and sharing the important work that you do, my final question to you as you probably know what's coming your way is what does being a Ceo mean to you?


46:26.74

Victoria

I Think um for me what it is is using my god-given talents to serve people in a way that really aligns with my core values and knowing that I don't have to sacrifice that because I'm the Ceo.


46:43.72

ellenyin

I love that beautiful, beautiful response. Ah, you just have such a beautiful heart. Thank you Victoria for your time. Thank you for your service. Um, and again if you know someone who could benefit from the work that Victoria does or if you yourself or someone grieving the loss of a loved one and you're you know part of the military or first responder make sure you check out the show notes below. We'll have all of the links so that you can connect and get the resources and support you need. Thanks Victoria!


47:12.92

Victoria

Thanks Ellen!



47:36.51

ellenyin

Hello hello we are back for lightning round with Victoria. She's a little nervous but we're cheering her on let's send her all the good energy. Okay, ah Victoria I promise I promise this won't be as hard as you think question number 1 whatever pops in your head None What is 1 thing that surprises most people about you.


47:59.50

Victoria

Oh this is easy. Ah, they are always surprised when they hear that I served in the Marine corps.


48:05.35

ellenyin

On the one hand I can understand their surprise but on the other hand I feel like you have such a tough spirit, such a spirit of a warrior, that I'm not surprised at all. But that's a good one.


48:19.34

Victoria

My students when I teach and that there's ah one particular lecture I do on perception and they have to guess certain things about me like what they perceive and this multiple choice and whenever they hear at the part about my first job out of college was I was in the marine corps. Everybody just you know falls.


48:43.29

ellenyin

Don't judge a book by its cover. Everyone all right question number 2 when are you most productive during the day or night if you're night out.


48:43.88

Victoria

Yeah, exactly.


48:51.90

Victoria

Oh goodness. Yeah um I am most productive generally speaking when I am on a time crunch. So it really doesn't matter what point of the day it is as long as I'm like I have an hour to do this and it has to get done now. That's when I'm most productive.


49:06.75

ellenyin

I I feel that but probably on a level That's not as intentional and planned. It's more like I'm forever a procrastinator so when push comes to shove I'm like all right, Let's do this. We have to do this. We've delayed it long enough. Okay.


49:17.59

Victoria

Ah, yes.


49:25.50

ellenyin

Final question for you. Ah Victoria what is 1 thing on your bucket list.


49:29.89

Victoria

Oh goodness. Ah, one thing on my bucket list, I really love to travel and I have my best friend who lives in Brazil. I've been to Brazil but I have not actually spent significant time. Visiting her there I was there for her daughter's baptism and so I would love to go and spend some time and travel in South America specifically Brazil


50:00.27

ellenyin

Same here I have. I've actually not been to South America yet and I would love to visit there's so many countries I would love to visit so great answer all right Victoria you crushed it.